Tips, training & advies
Chat of bel 0800 64 64 644
 Werkdagen: 09:00 - 17:00 uur

Coming from abroad

Anyone who is obligated to take out basic Dutch health insurance under the Health Insurance Act, must enroll with a health insurer to cover medical expenses within four months of arrival in the Netherlands.

The Dutch healthcare system is based on the principle of social solidarity. Therefore anyone, healthy or not, must contribute to the medical expenses of those who are ill. If you have an income or receive a social security benefit, you are also due to pay an income related premium. Depending on your situation, the percentage varies.

If you have the obligation to take out basic Dutch health insurance, you chose a health insurer and chose a policy that fits your needs. When you have received the policy sheet, you are insured from the day on the policy sheet.

Health insurers must accept anyone who are to take out the basic Dutch health insurance as it is then mandatory, regardless of their age or state of health. You are free to choose your own health insurer and change your health insurer once a year, with effect from January 1st.

The basic Dutch health insurance consists of the above mentioned basic Dutch health insurance, which is mandatory and an optional additional health insurance. There are more than forty health insurers (including labels) that offer basic Dutch health insurance policies as well as additional health insurances.

The mandatory health insurance covers:

  • Basic medical care; including care provided by general practitioners, medical specialists and obstetricians
  • Hospital treatment
  • Most medical prescriptions at the pharmacy
  • Dental care up to the age of 18
  • Maternity care
  • Limited therapies such as physiotherapy, speech therapy, occupational therapy and dietary advice
  • Medical devices and products

The supplementary insurance covers expenses that are not included in the mandatory basic Dutch health insurance. For example:

  • Dental care for adults
  • Physiotherapy
  • Glasses and contact lenses
  • Homeopathic or other alternative medical products

Check whether your employer offers a corporate health insurance to benefit from the discount on the premium for the mandatory basic Dutch health insurance.

People on a low income may be eligible for the healthcare benefit to help pay for the health insurance premium. You can apply for the healthcare benefit online or in person by making an appointment. You can call 'de BelastingTelefoon' 0800 0543 for information. Please call from abroad +31 555 385 385.

The monthly premium for the mandatory health insurance is approximately around € 128,06 (2022). Besides the monthly premium there is a mandatory policy excess. The policy excess concerns healthcare costs that are not reimbursed. The government determined that the excess for 2022 amounts to € 385,-. Medical costs that exceed this sum and are covered by your health insurance will be paid by the insurer.

If you visit your GP (in Dutch Huisarts), it will not be deducted from your policy excess. But some medical treatments are deducted from the policy excess, such as a blood test.

Newborns must be registered with a health insurer within four months after birth. If they are insured within 4 months after birth, the insurance will start from the day they were born. Are they insured after the first 4 months, the insurance will start on the day of application.

Everyone over the age of 18 pays a monthly premium for the basic Dutch health insurance. You start to pay the monthly premium on the first day of the month after your 18th birthday. Children under 18 do not have to pay any premium or policy excess.

If someone under 18 has no insurance obligation but starts to work, they must be insured with a basic Dutch health insurance from the first day of work. The parent, even without insurance obligation can take out the healthcare policy for the child under 18.

Your basic Dutch health insurance must start on the first day of work. If you are still searching for work, you cannot be insured with a basic Dutch health insurance.

Start a Wlz assessment and the SVB (Sociale Verzekeringsbank) will determine whether you need to be insured under the Wlz scheme or not.

You are not required to be insured in the Netherlands if you reside and work in the Netherlands for an employer based in your home country, you can remain insured in that country. You need to have an A1 certificate and apply for an S1 or E106 form with your health insurer in your home country. This form is used by the member states of the European Union (EU), European Economic Area (EEA) and Switzerland. With this certificate and form you can get medical care in the Netherlands.

1. You can take out an international health insurance. Ask the international office at your school if they can refer you to an international health insurer. Or use a search engine on the internet and type in "international health insurance Netherlands". You can chose the policy that fits you best.
2. You can keep the insurance from your insurer in your home country that provides medical health coverage in the Netherlands.

If you are obligated to take out basic Dutch health insurance, you can proof this by showing the insurer your work contract or a recent digital pay slip. You need to be registered with the municipality (in Dutch woonadres/briefadres) and you must have a BSN (in Dutch Burger Service Nummer).

If you are in the Netherlands for study purposes only, it's not required and not possible to take out a basic Dutch health insurance. You can keep the health insurance from your home country or take out international health insurance.

If you have a part-time job, you are required to have a basic Dutch health insurance from the first day of work.

If you are going to do an internship for which you are being paid at least as much as the Dutch minimum wage, you must be insured with a basic Dutch health insurance. Expenses are regarded as income for your internship, room and board may also be seen as such.

If you have received a letter from the CAK stating that you are ‘not insured’, it means that you do not have a Dutch basic health insurance. A Dutch basic health insurance is compulsory for people who work in the Netherlands. If you think you should not have to take out a Dutch basic health insurance as you are here for study purposes only (no work, no internship), contact the SVB (in Dutch ‘Sociale Verzekeringsbank’) to request a wlz assessment. For more information visit the SVB website.

Yes, the EHIC from your home country is valid in the Netherlands for necessary medical care during your stay. Check with your own health insurer before coming to the Netherlands how long the EHIC will be valid as it might expire. The EHIC will no longer be valid if you start to work in the Netherlands. You must then take out a Dutch health insurance.

You can find more information about EHIC here.

You are not required to be insured in the Netherlands if you reside and work in the Netherlands for an employer based in your home country, you can remain insured in that country. You need to have an A1 certificate and ask for an S1 or E106 form from your health insurer in your home country. This form is used by the member states of the European Union (EU), European Economic Area (EEA) and Switzerland. With this certificate and form you can get medical care in the Netherlands.

1.You can take out a private health insurance from an insurer in the Netherlands.
2.You can stay insured with the insurer in your home country that provides medical health coverage in the Netherlands.
3.You can take out an International health insurance.

If your premium is overdue, you risk paying extra costs. The health insurer will send you a letter when you are two months or more behind on your payments. You can then request for a payment arrangement. When you are four months behind or more on you premium payment, you will receive a last warning from your health insurer. Make a payment arrangement with your health insurer in time or go to your municipality for assistance to solve your debt problem.

The health insurer will charge you extra costs for not paying on time. You will stay insured for the basic Dutch health insurance. The additional health insurance will be stopped if you do not pay and you will lose your coverage.

What you should do in the event of payment arrears:

  • Respond to letters from your health insurer. Stay in touch and inform them about your financial problems.
  • Try to make a payment arrangement with your health insurer or the debt collection agency before the health insurer reports you to the CAK.
  • Apply for debt counselling with the municipality or a financial volunteer (from Humanitas or SchuldHulpMaatje for instance). They can also help you if you have other debts.

In the event of a six months premium debt, your health insurer will report you to the CAK. The monthly premium (in Dutch bestuursrechtelijke premie) due to the CAK is € 152,20 (2022).

This new monthly premium will be deducted directly from your wages or healthcare benefit. If it is deducted from your healthcare benefit you will additionally receive a giro from the CJIB (in Dutch Centraal Justitieel Incassobureau) to pay the rest of the premium.

With this new monthly premium, you do not pay of your debt with the health insurer. The increased premium will end once the entire debt has been paid or if you have made arrangements for debt counselling with your health insurer. You will then pay the normal premium to your health insurer from the first day of the new month after you made an agreement on the payment arrangement.

If you deregister with the municipality and end your policy with the health insurer, you will still have to pay the debt you have with the health insurer. Your debt will not be solved by leaving the Netherlands.

This page explains how healthcare is arranged for Ukrainians in the Netherlands.

Please note that the information below is subject to considerable change. Keep an eye on this website for changes.

If you have a question not listed here regarding reimbursement of care or health insurance, call Zorgverzekeringslijn toll-free at 0800 64 64 644 or +31 88 900 6960 if calling from abroad.

The Medical Care Regulations for Asylum Seekers reimburses medically necessary care. For more information, visit the RMA website (this information is only available in Dutch).

Basic health insurance reimburses the costs of care provided by a GP or hospital, for example. Visit the Dutch Government website to find out what is covered.

Yes, you must pay your health insurance premium every month. You must also pay the deductible and any co-payments. If you have taken out a Dutch health insurance policy, you may be eligible for a healthcare allowance.

Yes, you are allowed to work in the Netherlands. If you work in the Netherlands, you must take out Dutch health insurance. Find out how to take out health insurance.

If you have taken out a Dutch health insurance policy, you may be entitled to a healthcare allowance. View the terms and conditions at https://www.toeslagen.nl

A healthcare allowance is a contribution towards the basic health insurance premium and excess for people with a lower or middle income. The amount of healthcare allowance you are eligible for depends on your income and living situation, among other things.

When you start working, you must take out health insurance, or the CAK will fine you. If you do not earn enough, you can apply for a healthcare allowance to pay part of the premium.

If you are over 18 and have a Dutch health insurance policy, you can apply for a healthcare allowance. You can view the requirements and apply for the allowance through the official website of the Tax and Customs Administration: https://www.toeslagen.nl/.

No, you only have to take out Dutch health insurance if you work in the Netherlands.
Registration in the Personal Records Database (BRP) does not result in residency in the Netherlands; you are, therefore, not allowed to take out Dutch basic insurance.

For non-emergency care, you can contact the GP. They will refer you to a specialist if necessary.

Call the emergency number 112 for emergency care, such as if you or someone else needs urgent medical attention.

That depends on your situation.

Are you 18 or older?
If you are 18 or older, most dental treatments will not be reimbursed. Checkups are also not reimbursed.  Only dental surgery and removable dentures are covered. If you have Dutch health insurance with supplementary coverage for dentistry (oral care), please check your insurance policy conditions.

Are you under 18?
If you are under 18, most dental treatments will be reimbursed. This includes periodic checkups and fillings, as well as dental surgery.

Extraordinary oral care will be reimbursed for everyone
Extraordinary oral care (e.g., in the case of serious disorders or abnormalities) is always reimbursed.

Please note: Orthodontics and implants are never included in extraordinary oral care.

If you fall under the Medical Care Scheme for Asylum Seekers (RMA), the dentist will need to obtain authorisation before providing treatment.

The professional association for dentists, orthodontists and oral surgeons (the KNMT) is taking action to help refugees. You can read more about their approach on the website.

 

Yes, if the treatment is medically necessary. The GP or medical specialist will make that decision. Start by reporting to your GP.

If it is medically necessary that you give birth in the hospital, you will not have to pay anything for delivery at the hospital.

Registered medicines from the basic health insurance prescribed by your GP or specialist will be reimbursed. Once you have a prescription, you can pick up your medicine at the pharmacy.

No, you do not have to pay or advance anything yourself for medically necessary care paid for from the Subsidy Scheme for Medically Necessary Care for Uninsured Persons or from the Medical Care Scheme for Asylum Seekers.  Do not let anyone else pay for or advance anything either, as the bill may not be reimbursed in that case.

If you have basic Dutch health insurance, you may be required to pay part of it yourself.

Work is underway to address the need for interpreters in healthcare. Since 2022, the use of interpreters can be charged separately in the GGZ. Read more about this on the NZA website..

No. You must arrange and pay for transportation for appointments at the GP, hospital or specialist.

If you have basic Dutch health insurance, contact your health insurance company for more information.

Tell the care provider that your healthcare costs will be paid from the Subsidy Scheme for Medically Necessary Care for Uninsured Persons or the Medical Care Scheme for Asylum Seekers. Do not pay anything yourself.

If you have basic Dutch health insurance, you may be required to pay part of it yourself.

You do not have to do anything. The healthcare provider will take care of everything for you.

If you have basic Dutch health insurance, you may need to claim the healthcare bill from your insurer.

Contact the GP in your place of residence.

If you have a question not listed here regarding reimbursement of care or health insurance, call Zorgverzekeringslijn toll-free (0800 64 64 644).

List of definitions